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ABRSM and the National Open Youth Orchestra: A new partnership to showcase talented young disabled musicians

4 months ago


ABRSM and the National Open Youth Orchestra (NOYO) have announced a new partnership to help develop some of the UK’s most talented young disabled musicians as part of an inclusive ensemble.

ABRSM is sponsoring the National Open Youth Orchestra (NOYO) in its first year of being. Auditions for young musicians to join the world’s first disabled-led national youth orchestra are currently taking place and will close on 8 April, with the orchestra launching in Autumn 2018.

Young disabled and non-disabled people aged 11-25 with musical potential are invited to apply at noyo.org.uk. NOYO will build gradually, with NOYO Training centres running in 2018/19 in London, Bristol and Bournemouth in partnership with the Barbican and Guildhall School, Bristol Music Trust and the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra.

NOYO has been created  following the success of a regional pilot project, the South-West Open Youth Orchestra, which itself won the ABRSM-sponsored 2017 Royal Philharmonic Society Awards. ABRSM’s sponsorship will support NOYO recruitment and training of its first wave of fresh musical talent. The orchestra’s performances will begin in 2020.

ABRSM’s Chief Executive Michael Elliott: “NOYO celebrates innovative, inclusive music making, and that’s something that ABRSM is delighted to endorse and support. We welcome a partnership that will provide progression for both disabled and non-disabled musicians, on a high profile platform that will both showcase talent nationally and inspire and encourage the next generation of musicians throughout the UK.”

Barry Farrimond, CEO of the National Open Youth Orchestra: “NOYO is about nurturing musical excellence and ABRSM’s endorsement is invaluable in helping us communicate that. Through NOYO, disabled and non-disabled young musicians are empowered to create new musical contexts in which diversity can act as a catalyst for exciting new music, marrying the sounds of accessible, digital musical instruments with traditional acoustic ones.”

Image: Paul Blakemore

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